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Advance Queensland Research Fellows and PhD Scholars 2016

Meet our current research fellows and PhD scholars, whose work with Queensland research institutions are driving innovation and collaboration across new and existing industries.

From health, agriculture, energy and technology, to environmental solutions for the Great Barrier Reef, each project is positioning the state’s capability as a global science and research leader. Queensland as a leader in world-recognised research innovations.

Applications for Research fellowships and PhD scholarships open at the end of each year.

Search and view project profiles.

Mr Troy Meston

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander PhD Scholar—Troy Meston.

Mr Troy Meston

Project title: An indigenous journey through the 21st century educational landscapes of new metrics

Troy Meston has professional expertise in the embedding of indigenous perspectives inside learning curriculum as well as the modelling of effective and empowering pedagogies.  Specialising in educational initiatives as an arm of community outreach, he will develop an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) assessment tool to explore the Indigenous specific nuances associated with learning in the classroom.

This project will explore digital assessment to create a new generation of targeted assessment practice for indigenous learners. His new metrics model factors in student responsiveness and the relationships shared with the intergenerational legacy of the colonisation process and indigenous journey.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Cass Hunter

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research Fellow—Dr Cass Hunter.

Dr Cass Hunter

Project title: Transforming hidden data: An integrative information system for Torres Strait

Dr Cass Hunter's research interests are broadly focused on the development of participatory tools to support the sustainable management of marine systems and estimate future impacts on ecosystem services and livelihoods.

This project will develop innovative approaches for unlocking the value of extensive biophysical data sets from the Torres Strait through effective spatially explicit visual summaries and comparative views. There is huge potential to unlock large amounts of information from existing data, both within and across studies.  Unlocking information from past research from a range of subjects and topics will allow for high data synergies and new novel information.

Research sponsor: CSIRO

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Miss Megan Arnold

PhD Scholar—Megan Arnold.

Miss Megan Arnold

Project title: New prophylactic drugs for malaria

Miss Megan Arnold will carry out additional research into new effective malaria vaccine to potentially develop new lead drug candidates for malaria prevention based on compounds with unique chemical structures. Malaria is a disease caused by parasites that are transmitted by certain types of mosquitoes. The severity of malaria can range from flu-like symptoms to coma and death. In 2015 the World Health Organization estimated there were 214 million new cases of malaria and 438,000 malaria-related deaths. This equates to around 1200 people dying every day.  Unfortunately there is no broadly effective licensed malaria vaccine and malaria parasite resistance has been reported for all currently used drugs. This is a significant global health problem that has a direct impact on Queensland’s neighbours in the Asia-Pacific region.

Research sponsor: Griffith University

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Miss Nadia Campagnolo

PhD Scholar—Nadia Campagnolo.

Miss Nadia Campagnolo

Project title: The Association between Diet and Inflammation in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Miss Nadia Campagnolo will research the association between diet and inflammation in chronic fatigue syndrome. There is no known pathological mechanism for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and the annual cost of CFS in Australia is $720 million.

This research will investigate if modern diets, which contain high levels of Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) in food are linked to CFS and if dietary interventions can reduce the severity of CFS.

Research sponsor: Griffith University

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Miss Samantha Aird

PhD Scholar—Samantha Aird.

Miss Samantha Aird

Project title: Impacts of Long-Term Marine Resource Use on the GBR

Miss Samantha Aird will investigate the impacts of long-term marine resource use on Queensland’s Great Barrier Reef. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living along the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) coastline depend on shellfish and fin-fish as a source of food.  However, the sustainability of these fish resources to Indigenous predation within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) is unknown and has received little attention given the focus on establishing pre-European baselines for contemporary GBR fisheries management.

This research will use archaeological and zoological (archaeozoological) methods to assess human predation on key shellfish and fin-fish species from four island groups, located in northern, central and southern sections of the GBRMP.

Research sponsor: James Cook University

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Miss Bettina Glasl

PhD Scholar—Bettina Glasl.

Miss Bettina Glasl

Project title: Microbial indicators for water quality and environmental stress assessment

Miss Bettina Glasl is a marine biologist exploring microbial indicators for water quality and environmental stress assessment. Reef health is currently assessed using visual surveys of coral condition. However, visible signs of compromised health usually represent a late stage in the stress response when little management action can be taken to mitigate impact. Microorganisms are the first biological responders to any environmental perturbation and therefore represent sensitive early indicators for ecosystem health.

This project will assess the composition and function of microbial communities associated with coral reefs, as microbial indicators have the potential to make a significant contribution to an Integrated Reef Monitoring Program.

Research sponsor: James Cook University

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Mrs Saira Sanjida

PhD Scholar—Saira Sanjida.

Mrs Saira Sanjida

Project title: Role of antidepressants in cancer risk and treatment outcomes

Mrs Saira Sanjida will conduct research on the role of antidepressants in cancer risk and treatment outcomes during her Masters of Applied Science in the School of Public Health and Social Work, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation at QUT. Cancer patients are at high-risk of developing depression after a cancer diagnosis and the risk remains high throughout the treatment and post-treatment survival time. Antidepressants are used for depression treatment; however, they show potential side-effects and drug to drug interactions with other medicines and may threaten the cancer patient life. This project aims to overcome these gaps, by focussing on the antidepressant's role in cancer risk and treatment outcomes.

Research sponsor:  Queensland University of Technology

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Mrs Rena Louise Cruz

PhD Scholar—Rena Louise Cruz.

Mrs Rena Louise Cruz

Project title: Advanced 3D biofabrication approaches for the treatment of microtia

Mrs Rena Louise Cruz from the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation at QUT will look at advanced 3D biofabrication approaches for the treatment of microtia (a congenital ear deformity).

This project will develop novel 3D bioprinting approaches to produce rapid, low-cost, and realistic customised treatment options for children with Microtia.  Microtia is a congenital disorder that affects the formation of either one or both ears and is often associated with Atresia leading to impaired hearing.  The initial prosthetic that will be developed for growing children (where an implant would be unsuitable) will be manufactured with multiple layers. It will be a multi-material prosthetic with internal cartilage structure to mimic the mechanical properties of real cartilage and external medical grade silicone to match the elastic skin and fat tissue properties.

Research sponsor: Queensland University of Technology

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Mrs Rebecca Stockwell

PhD Scholar—Rebecca Stockwell.

Mrs Rebecca Stockwell

Project title: Hospital environments and the spread of cough aerosols

Mrs Rebecca Stockwell from the University of Queensland will research hospital environments and the spread of cough aerosols. The cost of delivering respiratory-related healthcare services is expected to triple in the next 15 years. Queensland scientists have found that the dominant respiratory pathogen in people with cystic fibrosis was viable in cough aerosols suggesting transmission may be through the air. There is now an urgent need to develop our knowledge of the transmission of respiratory pathogens to prevent the spread of infection. 

This project will result in a greater understanding of the transmission pathways of respiratory infections in people with chronic lung disease and how altering the hospital environment can impact on the spread of infection.

Research sponsor: QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute

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Dr Johanna Lynch

PhD Scholar—Johanna Lynch.

Dr Johanna Lynch

Project title: 'Sense of safety': a new way to see mental health?

Dr Johanna Lynch is a general practitioner with post graduate training in grief and loss and ongoing professional education in trauma and attachment.  Her research project 'Sense of safety': a new way to see mental health?' will look at a new way to assess mental distress in primary care that integrates research from many disciplines (including attachment, trauma, neurobiology and others) in order to improve access to appropriate ongoing care. Current research and therapy confirms the traumatised in our community can receive treatment that enables them to return to the work force and to functional social connectedness. And yet, this research is not integrated into normal primary mental health care and assessment.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Miss Rebecca Garrad

PhD Scholar—Rebecca Garrad.

Miss Rebecca Garrad

Project title: Pastures as tools for pest suppression

Miss Rebecca Garrad will investigate a natural method for agricultural pest control.  Agricultural pests cause substantial crop damage and result in major crop yield losses. Crop pests are highly mobile and do not recognise field or farm boundaries, therefore attempts to control them at the field level generally fail. Chemical pesticides also come with a high cost to human health and the environment, making research into natural methods of pest control vital. 

This research will be conducted in the relatively new but significant area of pest-suppressive landscapes; landscapes that provide valuable habitat for natural enemies whilst limiting suitable habitat for pest species. I believe that this research has the potential to influence the agricultural industry of Australia by providing real-world management suggestions and strategies to growers looking to benefit from natural pest control.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Mr Nicholas McCarthy

PhD Scholar—Nicholas McCarthy.

Mr Nicholas McCarthy

Project title: Breathing fire: understanding the meteorology of pyro-convection in bushfires.

Mr Nicholas McCarthy will lead a pilot project to understand and model the intense columns of heat above bushfires, known as convective plumes.

This project aims to get a deeper understanding behind the meteorology of pyro-convection in bushfires and collect the first observational data on Australian pyro-convection over bushfires and the impact on local fire meteorology. This data and new knowledge will underpin development of improved numerical bushfire prediction methods by the Bureau of Meteorology and the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Mr Eric Wu

PhD Scholar—Eric Wu.

Mr Eric Wu

Project title: Development of a 'Smart' heart assist device

Mr Eric Wu will address heart failure complications with the development of a Smart heart assist device. Cardiovascular disease is a debilitating condition that causes more deaths (~50 000) than any other disease group in Australia. Gold-standard treatment for end-stage heart failure is transplantation. However, limited donor hearts and rise in prevalence, has demanded the need for Rotary Blood Pumps (RBPs). RBPs function by drawing fluid from an inlet and propelling to an outlet through rotational-speed. These devices however typically operate at a constant rotational-speed. This is undesirable as the RBP is unable to adapt to changes in patient demand from exercise and sleep, and this can result in secondary complications.

This project will develop a RBP management system that automatically adjusts pump speed to suit patient needs to minimise the risk of heart failure in patients.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr David Blondeau-Patissier

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr David Blondeau-Patissier.

Dr David Blondeau-Patissier

Project title: Satellite Detection of Marine Pollution in the Great Barrier Reef

Dr David Blondeau-Patissier at CSIRO will develop his technology for satellite detection of marine pollution in the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). The GBR is facing a number of considerable threats including increased industrial coastal development and ship traffic. As a result, sewage from mining and oil spills from ship incidents are more likely, creating site contamination as well as physical damage to the reef.  A timely, accurate and automated detection of surface pollution (location, type and source) would significantly improve the coastal management capabilities of the marine park and trigger faster environmental response.

This project aims at developing an automated pollution detection system from the synergetic use of advanced optical, thermal and radar sensors from next-generation earth observation satellites.

Research sponsor: CSIRO

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Dr Wayne Water

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Wayne Water.

Dr Wayne Water

Project title: Making Solar Better: Advanced Electronics for Distributed Energy Storage

Dr Wayne Water will investigate ways to improve solar energy outcomes through advanced electronics for distributed energy storage. According to Dr Water, the growing number of solar photovoltaic system installations has led to power quality issues in the low voltage distribution networks, including higher costs and risk of appliance failure. Dr Water’s research proposes a solution by developing an advanced Direct Current (DC) converter to be used in a single-conversion stage topology with battery energy storage.

"There are several advantages to this technology, such as high efficiency on battery charging, as well as protecting appliances and reducing the risk of electric shock. Furthermore, even with only one solar panel working on the roof, the system can still function at the best possible state."

Due to the increased number of solar photovoltaic system installations, there are emerging power quality issues in the low voltage distribution networks. Unregulated and intermittent power-flow from solar systems can increase the overall cost on providing electricity to consumers along with destabilising voltage characteristics which can cause electrical appliance failures.

This research project proposes a solution to these and other potential issues by developing an advanced Direct Current (DC) converter to be used in a single-conversion stage topology with battery energy storage.

Research sponsor: Griffith University

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Dr Fernanda Adame

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Fernanda Adame.

Dr Fernanda Adame

Project title: Cost-effective restoration of wetlands that protect the Great Barrier Reef

Dr Fernanda Adame will use a novel approach for evaluating the suitability and priority for restoration of wetlands that protect the Great Barrier Reef. Wetlands act as a buffer between farm land and the ocean, trapping run-off nutrients and pollutants that might otherwise prove harmful to the reef’s health. The increase in terrestrial-derived pollutants, especially nutrients derived from fertilisers, has caused the deterioration of the Great Barrier Reef. Terrestrial runoff can be ameliorated by wetlands, which are very efficient at trapping pollutants.  Wetland restoration is efficient but expensive, and funds need to be efficiently allocated.

This project will apply and advance a novel methodology, which incorporates ecological, economic and social factors to determine the most cost-effective restoration projects based on: 1) Restoration should be cheap, feasible and maximise ecological and social returns; 2) Funds should be allocated to wetlands that efficiently trap terrestrial pollutants; 3) Wetlands that deliver additional ecosystem services should be prioritised.

Research sponsor: Griffith University

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Dr Daniel Smith

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Daniel Smith.

Dr Daniel Smith

Project title: A smartphone-based decision support tool to stimulate cyclone mitigation

Dr Daniel Smith will develop a smartphone-based decision support tool to stimulate cyclone mitigation. Issues surrounding losses to the community from cyclone damage and associated premium affordability in Queensland have been highlighted with the introduction of the Northern Australia Insurance Premiums Taskforce, a Productivity Commission review and a number of Australian Government Actuary reports.

This project aims to develop an actionable, research-based approach to mitigation in Queensland and other wind-prone regions of Australia.  The benefits to Queensland include stimulation of mitigation action among homeowners, reduction of loss and suffering from severe wind events and insurance premium reductions resulting from enhanced housing resilience.

Research sponsor: James Cook University

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Dr Zoe Bainbridge

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Zoe Bainbridge.

Dr Zoe Bainbridge

Project title: Identifying sources of fine sediments to protect the GBR

Dr Zoe Bainbridge will build on research which identified the primary sources of sediment exported from the Burdekin River catchment (133,000 km2), the largest single source of sediment to the Great Barrier Reef. Inshore Great Barrier Reef (GBR) coral reef and seagrass ecosystems have been negatively impacted by increased turbidity and sedimentation associated with runoff of sediments and associated constituents from the adjacent coastal catchments.

This project will for the first time characterise and trace the origin(s) of the sediments that are most responsible for the declining condition of the GBR. This will enable direct targeting of the sources of this material to achieve maximum benefits to GBR health from catchment management actions.

Research sponsor: James Cook University

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Dr Philip Mosley

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Philip Mosley.

Dr Philip Mosley

Project title: Psychiatric symptoms after deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease

Dr Phillip Mosley will investigate the psychiatric symptoms as a result of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for Parkinson's Disease (PD). It involves stimulating a region of the brain with an implanted electrode. However, a significant proportion of DBS patients develop disabling psychiatric symptoms, including mood and personality change. Currently there isn’t a reliable method of predicting which patients are at great risk of developing psychiatric problems.

The research will use high-resolution MRI brain scans to construct a detailed connectivity map for each patient. This will identify the brain connections associated with post-DBS psychiatric symptoms and define reliable indicators of stimulation. This information will be used to identify high-risk patients proactively and reduce unsuccessful DBS outcomes (including loss of life).

Research sponsor: QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute

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Dr Anjali Jaiprakash

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Anjali Jaiprakash.

Dr Anjali Jaiprakash

Project title: Robotic leg-holding device making keyhole knee-surgery easier and safer

Dr Anjali Jaiprakash has developed a robotic leg-holding device making keyhole knee-surgery easier and safer. Knee arthroscopy is a well-established procedure with more than four million cases and costing the global healthcare system over USD$15 billion annually. The complexities associated with arthroscopic procedures dictate relatively longer learning curves for surgeons and post-surgery complications are debilitating. Robotic assisted arthroscopy will reduce these shortcomings, alleviating some of the health access and work force stressors on the health system.  This project aims to gather data to understand challenges surgeons face during surgery. Secondly, a 3D motion capture system and data-glove will be used to track the relative position of the patient's leg as well as the doctor's hands and instruments during a knee arthroscopy with high precision. The data will be analysed to develop a vision-based robotic leg-manipulation system for better surgical outcomes.

Research sponsor:  Queensland University of Technology

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Dr Jason Edwards

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Jason Edwards.

Dr Jason Edwards

Project title: Novel approach to reduce productivity losses from injuries and illnesses

Dr Jason Edwards will research a novel approach to reduce productivity losses from injuries and illnesses. Workplace illnesses and injuries cost the Australian economy over $60 billion dollars annually, accounting for approximately 4.8% of GDP. Effective management of Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) is positively associated with business productivity and performance measures. The aim of this research is to provide evidence-based knowledge to underpin future WHS regulatory interventions and policies.  Recent safety culture research in the heavy vehicle industry, has demonstrated that by understanding the cultural beliefs, attitudes and values of workforces, it is possible to identify effective intervention and communication approaches to improve WHS.

Research sponsor: Queensland University of Technology

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Dr Mariam Darestani

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Mariam Darestani.

Dr Mariam Darestani

Project title: Water purification  pipes for irrigation using poor quality water resources

Dr Mariam Darestani will develop new water purification pipe technology for irrigation using poor quality water resources.  Freshwater water resources are declining globally. Although other impurities can also harm plants, so often salt is the main issue. Desalination technologies have advanced significantly but still are energy extensive and costly for irrigation.

This research aims to develop a cost-effective technology for irrigation.  These water purification pipes comprise of hydrogel layer supporting a membrane that faces poor quality water inside the pipes. This sidewall structure passes water but rejects salt and other pollutants; and the water stored in hydrogel layer is gradually extracted by the plants.  Preliminary experiments have proven the feasibility, and during this fellowship we will develop the products and protect the intellectual properties before production phase. These products can be used for irrigation using poor quality water sources such coal seam gas water. This innovative technology can also help to reduce water wastage.

Research sponsor: Queensland University of Technology

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Dr Sabesan Sivapalan

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Sabesan Sivapalan.

Dr Sabesan Sivapalan

Project title: Deep Learning for Large Scale Logo Identification and Semantic Search

Dr Sabesan Sivapalan will research deeper learnings and search technology for large scale logo identification and company trademarks. In 2014, Forbes estimated the world's top 100 brands to be worth over $1.5 Trillion. However, brand infringement is an increasing common and costly issue.  Companies can protect their brand through Trademark registration, but to maintain that protection, they also have to enforce their Intellectual Property rights. Unfortunately, as most watch services are based on text-searching, it is currently very difficult to find infringement in images, for instance on e-commerce sites like e-Bay, TaoBao, and Alibaba.

This project will involve two research components 1) Developing large-scale image recognition algorithms to efficiently identify potentially infringing images from websites, and 2) Developing deep-learning techniques to derive semantic data from logos/images to automatically generate text descriptions.

Research sponsor: Queensland University of Technology

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Dr Muxina Konarova

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Muxina Konarova.

Dr Muxina Konarova

Project title: Sustainable production of ethanol fuel from waste-gas

Dr Muxina Konarova will develop and commercialise the sustainable production of ethanol fuel from waste-gas using innovative technology to make ethanol in small scale. The process converts syngas, obtained from landfill-biogas, biomass gasification or stranded coal seam gas into ethanol-fuel.  This technology will utilise the robust, highly-efficient nanostructured catalysts we have developed and integrate them into modular microchannel reactors using 3D printing. This approach enables precise engineering of the catalytic structure and their arrangement at the nano and micro-scales needed for efficient conversion of syngas to ethanol.  The ultimate commercial goal is to develop a modular plant costing less than $20M that can nominally produce 10,000t/y of ethanol.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Arnold Wiliem

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Arnold Wiliem.

Dr Arnold Wiliem

Project title: Transforming Queensland Health Care via Digital Pathology

Dr Arnold Wiliem will investigate ways to transform Queensland health care using digital pathology.  Pathology plays a crucial role in Queensland's health care system being the scientific basis of 70% of medical diagnoses. Unfortunately, it is projected that Queensland will have a shortage of pathologists in the near future. This is exacerbated by the increasing demand for pathology services due to changes in demographics due to the baby-boomers reaching retirement age coupled with increased life expectancy. 

Partnering with Sullivan Nicolaides Pathology (SNP), this fellowship aims to develop cutting edge Digital Pathology and Telepathology (DPT) to significantly advance the Queensland health care system.  The fellowship focuses on developing automatic slide scanning and image analysis for DPT. It breaks new ground by developing scanning methods for fluorescence specimens - a challenging but important problem as many pathology tests use fluorescence microscopy.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Hong Peng

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Hong Peng.

Dr Hong Peng

Project title: Unlocking Queensland's bauxite ore reserves through process technology innovation

Dr Hong Peng will look to unlock Queensland's bauxite ore reserves through process technology innovation. North Queensland hosts vast reserves of aluminium-containing bauxite mineral deposits which cannot be economically processed using existing technologies due to elevated levels of the main impurity, reactive silica. This potential feedstock to alumina refineries in Gladstone as well as to the global market is locked in the ground, waiting for an innovative engineering processing solution for this high silica bauxite. Researchers at The University of Queensland in collaboration with Rio Tinto have developed a pathway to upgrade the bauxite. The new approach adds value to the ore and improves environmental outcomes.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Paul Luckman

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Paul Luckman.

Dr Paul Luckman

Project title: Comercial scale production of N-Sorptive Superabsorbent Biopolymers for Sugarcane Fertilizers

Dr Paul Luckman will explore commercial scale production of N-Sorptive superabsorbent biopolymers for sugarcane fertilisers. Sugarcane is the largest crop located across 378,000 hectares of Great Barrier Reef (GBR) catchments and is the biggest contributor to Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen (DIN), with an estimated 80,000 tonnes of Nitrogen (N) entering the GBR lagoon each year; up-to 6-times above natural backgrounds.  The sugarcane industry currently lacks effective tools to solve the N problem. Only one-third of fertiliser-N is captured by the harvested crop, leaving 70% of fertiliser-N unaccounted for.  Commercial fertilisers readily dissolve in soil at a rate that exceeds the crops N uptake capacity, the excess-N is then washed into water ways and is lost from the crop.

In this project, the needs of the sugarcane growers and the needs of the environment are perfectly aligned, neither can afford the continued loss of N into our waterways.  This project will modify natural biopolymers using a scalable commercial reactive extrusion process, to provide the sorptive matrix materials for the next generation of sugarcane fertilisers.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Nasim Amiralian

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Nasim Amiralian.

Dr Nasim Amiralian

Project title: Advancement and Commercialisation of Spinifex Nanocellulose Enhanced Rubber Products

Dr Nasim Amiralian will look to make further advancement and commercialisation of spinifex nanocellulose enhanced rubber products. This proposal involves the application of a patented Queensland nanotechnology for the reinforcement of ultra-thin and strong condoms and surgical gloves, and more durable compounded rubber materials. In the manufacture of condoms, latex rubber materials are sought that are resistant to breakage, but also have high flexibility to allow for a close fit and improved feel of sensation.  In other elastomer applications, high toughness is desired while still retaining the soft, elastic nature of the material.  The common reinforcing agents to improve the mechanical properties of rubbers, result in undesirable increases in stiffness and reductions.  When spinifex nanocellulose is used as a reinforcing agent, it produces highly durable, strong and thin condoms and gloves. Derby rubber and other industries will collaborate on this project to ensure the translation of this nanotechnology to the broader global $200b rubber market.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Pradeep Shukla

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Pradeep Shukla.

Dr Pradeep Shukla

Project title: Upscaling and developing on-site cyanide plant for gold/base metal mines

Dr Pradeep Shukla will develop a new and significantly safer technology for producing cyanide on the mine site and on-demand basis, consequently preventing the bulk transport of this toxic material via public roads/town and storage of cyanide at mine-sites.  This will substantially reduce risks associated with cyanide handling transportation and storage, reduce the environmental footprint associated with cyanide production and supply, and reduce the end-user cost of cyanide.  Based on the successful demonstration of a pilot plant at Henty gold mine, the project will upscale the process, which will provide innovative research output in enhanced energy recovery, reaction optimization and improve details of system design. These modifications will allow the proposed process to be technologically and commercially feasible at more than 75% of the world's operating mines that require the use of cyanide in their process.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Juan Ortiz

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Juan Ortiz.

Dr Juan Ortiz

Project title: Maximising GBR resilience by integrating physiology, evolutionary biology, and macroecology

Dr Juan Ortiz will develop a new monitoring program and an interactive tool that can be used by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and the Queensland Government to maximise the effectiveness of management interventions to maximise the Great Barrier Reef's (GBF) resilience by integrating physiology, evolutionary biology, and macroecology. The GBR has been subjected to a multitude of local and global stressors jeopardizing its ecological integrity. 

This project will develop a multidisciplinary approach that expands and integrates the three most recent developments in our understanding of the physiological, ecological and evolutionary functioning of GBR corals to:

  1. Identify reefs that present high recovery ability, high connectivity value, and high probability of maintaining their thermal tolerance.
  2. Develop an interactive tool to assist GBRMPA in the identification of management goals based on site specific thresholds in coral population vital rates that can be dynamically evaluated and realistically achieved through local management.
  3. Design a targeted monitoring program to provide the information required to apply the interactive tool within the economic and logistical limitations of GBRMPA and the Queensland Government.  New maps identifying sections of the Great Barrier where management actions are more likely to help maintaining the reef ecological integrity are expected to result from the project.
  4. Dr Ortiz will work with the Great Barrier Reef Foundation, the Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage Protection and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority on the project.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Sergio Torres

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Sergio-Andres Galindo-Torres.

Dr Sergio Torres

Project title: Pushing the boundaries of current numerical geotechnical modelling capabilities

Dr Sergio-Andres Galindo-Torres will push the boundaries of current numerical geotechnical modelling capabilities.
Queensland economic sustainability depends on extraction industries and clean energy sources such as the coal seam gas (CSG).  Proper planning and design of extraction methods are of key importance to maximise the extraction output and to minimise the potentially hazardous effects. This project proposed to extend the current simulation software capabilities for the planning and risk assessment of coal seam gas extraction sites.  It is expected that the improved simulation platforms will increase the technical expertise of future consultancy projects, provide tools to visualise and communicate results to the public and carry out applied and fundamental research.

Research sponsor: Dr Sergio Torres

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Dr Farhad Fatehi

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Farhad Fatehi.

Dr Farhad Fatehi

Project title: Using telemedicine for improving diabetes management in Queensland

Dr Farhad Fatehi will implement and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a mobile-based system to automatically capture and transmit clinical data of people with diabetes in Queensland and enable large-scale remote monitoring and management of patients. Diabetes imposes important challenges to the Queensland health care system and inadequate access to care leads to development of complications and worsening of health problems, that in turn increases the economic burden on the health system. This system will utilise Bluetooth and mobile technology to improve the labour-intensive jobs of initiation and titration of insulin for people with type 2 diabetes.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Yifan Wang

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Yifan Wang.

Dr Yifan Wang

Project title: Reconfigurable mm-wave antenna systems for satellite communications

Dr Yifan Wang is working to link up isolated communities with the rest of the world by improving millimetre-wave satellite technology. A low-cost reconfigurable antenna system would connect with low-earth-orbit satellites, allowing a high-speed data rate.  The antenna technology developed by Dr Wang, in collaboration with Brisbane-based EM Solutions Pty Ltd, would use a flat and compact satellite terminal with automatic tracking. Orbiting as low as 160 kilometres, the satellite would send powerful targeted signals to users, known as beamforming. The proposed high-performance antenna system is to be used on ground terminals that are suitable for placement on stationary/mobile platforms such as vehicles, airplanes, ships or trains. The main purpose of these antenna systems is to establish a mobile communication hub through a low-earth-orbit (LEO) satellite at Ka-band, which is independent of any terrestrial networks, enabling the delivery of high-speed voice, data and video traffic. This is especially important to Queensland where it has vast remote areas in desperate need for broadband internet and other wireless services.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Gabriele Netzel

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Gabriele Netzel.

Dr Gabriele Netzel

Project title: Managing the detrimental effects of indospicine through rumen metabolism

Dr Gabriele Netzel will investigate the detrimental effects of indospicine through rumen metabolism.  The goal is to deliver an inoculum against the detrimental effects of the plant toxin indospicine on cattle to benefit the beef industry and Queensland's market reputation. Indigofera linnaei is widespread in Queensland rangelands, highly-palatable and a likely contributor to the known high incidence of cattle reproductive losses in these regions. Indospicine accumulation in the meat tissues of livestock has the potential to impact on the health of the consumer (both human and animal).  Preliminary trials have demonstrated that degradation of indospicine can occur with rumen-fluid fermentation.

This project will investigate this degradation, to identify responsible ruminal microbes, and to develop an inoculum which would enable indospicine to be metabolised.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Sunil Panchal

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Sunil Panachal.

Dr Sunil Panchal

Project title: Functional foods for healthy ageing of a growing elderly population

Dr Sunil Panchal will focus his functional food research for healthy ageing of a growing elderly population. This research will further investigate treatments for these chronic inflammatory diseases to provide an evidence basis for dietary options to improve the health of the people in the community.

In Queensland, the number of people aged 65 years and older has doubled over the past 25 years, and for those aged 85 years and older, it has doubled in the past 15 years. Thus, we have an elderly population living for longer with ageing-related complications requiring more and costlier treatments.  Also around 60% of Queensland's population is overweight or obese and obesity damages the cardiovascular system and metabolic control for which effective treatment is more difficult to sustain in an ageing population. Dr Panchal and USQ’s Functional Foods Research Group (FFRG), have shown that foods which could be useful in reversing obesity and improving the structure and function of the heart and liver include purple carrots, Queen Garnet plums, and seaweeds.

This project will target these chronic age-related complications through the use of functional foods. Collaborating with Nature Pacific Pty Ltd (Gold Coast) and Nutrafruit Pty Ltd (Toowong) to source sustainable products the project will explore effective and affordable food products in partnership with the Manitoba Agri-Health Research Network to develop commercial products and determine their clinical potential.

Research sponsor: University of Southern Queensland

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Dr Natassia Goode

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Natassia Goode.

Dr Natassia Goode

Project title: A proactive approach for reducing medication errors in Queensland hospitals

Dr Natassia Goode will research a proactive approach for reducing medication errors in Queensland hospitals. Medication errors are one of the most frequently reported incidents within hospitals in Queensland. Currently, healthcare services primarily rely on incident reporting and investigation to identify preventative strategies to address medication errors.

This research aims to apply and evaluate a novel and proactive approach to analysing and redesigning the complex work systems involved in medication delivery.  Partnering with the Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service (SCHHS), the project will analyse:  1) the sub-tasks, people, technologies, information, and the interactions between them involved in tasks associated with medication errors; 2) the network of controls that are used to manage the risks associated with medication delivery; and 3) these analyses will enable a diagnosis of the pathways to failure within the system, and will identify opportunities for system redesign to prevent future errors.

Research sponsor: University of Sunshine Coast

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Dr  Kameron Dunn

Research Fellow, Early-Career—Dr Kameron Dunn.

Dr  Kameron Dunn

Project title: Transforming Queensland’s agricultural and petroleum waste products into advanced composites.

Dr Kameron Dunn seeks to value add to Queensland biofuel waste products and the recycled waste oil residue asphalt, via the partial depolymerisation of these products into monomer and dimer phenolic structures using a hydrothermal liquefaction process. In addition, the research seeks to optimise novel chemical engineering refining and polymerisation processes to recover and make suitable such products for both resin production and/or as precursors, as required in the large scale production of carbon fibre and carbon fibre composites.

This project seeks to lay down the initial foundations of an Advanced Carbon Fibre Composite Industry forged from the already existing advantages of local Queensland industries. In the broader context, the project seeks to bridge the divide between the existing Queensland Sugarcane Industry and the Queensland Petrochemical Industry and connect, integrate and equip these Queensland industries with advanced manufacturing capability and knowhow in biorefining.

Research sponsor: Queensland University of Technology

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Dr Chengyuan Xu

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Chengyuan Xu.

Dr Chengyuan Xu

Project title: Early Detection of Crop Stresses in Tropical Protected Cropping Systems

Dr. Chengyuan (Stephen) Xu is a Plant Ecologist who started his academic career as a plant ecophysiologist and is now a researcher at Central Queensland University.  Horticulture is Queensland's second largest primary industry and represents a third of Australia's fruit and vegetable production and is one of the fastest growing sectors of Australian agriculture, and protected cropping or greenhouse production systems are a significant segment of that growth. These systems are amongst the most labour intensive of all agricultural systems, so an expansion in protected cropping offers major economic and employment gains for regional communities. 

This project will develop management practices for model crops blueberry and capsicum, generating knowledge and tools applicable to a broad range of fruit and vegetable crops. The project will deliver an innovative, low-cost crop stress alert tool which will provide critical crop information to growers to optimise productivity.  Project outputs will increase productivity and profitability in the model crops, and provide tools and knowledge to support the investment potential of protected cropping systems in Queensland. 

Research sponsor: Central Queensland University

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Dr Darrell Strauss

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Darrell Strauss.

Dr Darrell Strauss

Project title: Development of cost effective, large-scale nearshore nourishment for Queensland beaches

Dr Darrell Strauss will research the development of cost effective, large-scale nearshore nourishment for Queensland beaches. Beach nourishment is the principal means of protecting shorelines subject to extreme event erosion and long-term recession due to climate variability.   Erosion events have always gained a lot of interest however measurements and understanding of the much slower natural recovery rates and impacts of artificial beach replenishments are still scarce. This information is needed if we’re to come up with more cost-effective and sustainable ways to adapt to the challenges of the future and build more resilient coastlines. Detailed process monitoring of large scale beach nourishment projects are rare.

The project aims to quantify the morphodynamic response to large-scale nourishment of Queensland beaches by developing the process understanding and numerical modelling capability for the dynamic transport of sand under the influence of a range of wave and current conditions in shallow water depths, with a particular focus on the onshore movement of sand.

Research sponsor: Griffith University

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Dr Paul Giacomin

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Paul Giacomin.

Dr Paul Giacomin

Project title: New therapies for Coeliac Disease: Helminths and their secreted products

Dr Paul Giacomin is an immunologist based at the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine at James Cook University in Cairns.  Research will investigate the key immune cells and cytokines involved in immunity to intestinal worms, as well as exploring the potential beneficial effects that worm infection may have in alleviating inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases.

Coeliac Disease (CeD) is a common and debilitating autoimmune disorder (affecting 1% of the Queensland population) where gluten ingestion triggers an inflammatory reaction and severe intestinal symptoms. A gluten-free diet is effective for some, but is expensive, inconvenient and inadvertent gluten exposure is common. Hence there is a need for new treatments for CeD.  Parasitic helminths (worms) infections are now thought to assist in CeD management.

The project aims to translate this novel therapy into a larger, placebo-controlled clinical trial and study the mechanisms by which worms control the immune response.  Identification of the molecules that the worms produce to suppress gluten-induced pathology will allow the development of pill-based medications for CeD, and potentially other autoimmune or inflammatory conditions. Dr Giacomin’s research focuses on coeliac disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes an inflammatory reaction and severe intestinal symptoms when gluten is ingested.  As part of the research Dr Giacomin and colleagues will run a larger study, with 60 participants in a double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical trial at Queensland hospitals.  Dr Giacomin’s research could also shed new light on possible treatments for other inflammatory diseases such as Crohn’s and asthma.

Research sponsor: James Cook University

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Dr Natalie Prow

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Natalie Prow.

Dr Natalie Prow

Project title: Development of a vaccine for chikungunya virus

Dr Natalie Prow will works as a member of the Inflammation Biology group at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute to further develop a vaccine for chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Sementis (an unlisted public biotechnology company) has developed and patented a proprietary vaccine delivery technology, the Sementis Copenhagen Vector (SCV), which is being applied to the development of a chikungunya virus (CHIKV) vaccine. 

Dr Prow’s fellowship seeks to undertake pre-clinical evaluation of the SCV/CHIKV vaccine at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute (QIMRB) using the CHIKV mouse model of infection and disease developed at QIMRB.  CHIKV is related to, but causes more severe disease than, our Ross River virus, and has recently caused the largest global epidemic ever recorded for this virus.  Millions of CHIKV cases have been reported, primarily in Africa, Asia, and the Americas (but also Papua New Guinea and several Pacific Islands). 

Research sponsor QMRI

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Dr Azharul Karim

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Azharul Karim.

Dr Azharul Karim

Project title: Intelligent microwave assisted convective dryer for agricultural products

Dr Azharul Karim will develop intelligent microwave assisted convective dryer technology for agricultural products.  Australian fruits and vegetables have a gross value of production of A$9 billion, of which $1.2 billion is exported. Food processing is time consuming and energy intensive as most fruits and vegetables contain more than 80% water.  Combining intermittent microwave energy with Solar drying (IMSD) significantly reduces drying time and energy usage.

This research aims to develop an intelligent intermittent microwave assisted solar drying method, which can be applied to any agricultural products.  Theoretical model for IMSD will be developed to investigate quality changes during IMSD. CFD models will be developed to investigate flow and temperature profile inside the drying chamber and silos. This will help to design best shape of the drying chamber/ silo in terms of uniformity of air-flow, heat distribution and product quality. A prototype microwave assisted solar dryer will be manufactures and tested.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Emma Bolderson

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Emma Bolderson.

Dr Emma Bolderson

Project title: Targeting genome stability in cancer

Dr Emma Bolderson from the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation at The Queensland University of Technology will an advance work on developing next generation anti-cancer drugs targeting genome stability in cancer. The research team have discovered a number of biological anti-cancer agents that have proven effective in inhibiting two of the key proteins responsible for the survival of cancer cells. In the lab that these drugs kill cancer cells dead in their tracks. What’s also exciting is that these drugs are much less toxic and so will have fewer side-effects than many of the current chemotherapeutics on the market.

This project move to the next phase of the drug development process.  Although we are making inroads into the treatment and management of cancer, cures are seldom mentioned and a remission of months is regarded as successful.  Patients presenting with metastatic disease are almost exclusively non-curable. It is vital, that we understand this disease at the molecular level, that we identify new therapeutic targets and biomarkers. It is generally agreed that targeting the genome stability pathways, offer one of the best hopes of tackling cancers. Given the evidence, it is vital that we understand how normal cellular processes protect us from genome instability and how ultimately genome stability functions in cancer and cancer progression.  A novel mechanism for cancer treatment has been developed that uses chemically modified DNA molecules targeting DNA repair proteins. This research aims to further characterise these DNA molecules as an effective cancer treatment.

Research sponsor: Queensland University of Technology

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Dr Yateendra Mishra

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Yateendra Mishra.

Dr Yateendra Mishra

Project title: Maximising renewable energy penetration through smart inverter deployment and control

Dr Yateendra Mishra will be researching the maximisation of renewable energy penetration through smart inverter deployment utilising Statcom technology. This research will determine the optimum sizing, placement and control of three-phased STATCOMs into the electricity distribution network to enable higher penetration of renewable energy sources in Queensland.

This project will build capacity of local manufacturers to deliver cost-effective solutions to address the technical challenges faced by Queensland distribution network service providers (DNSPs) in integrating renewable energy and supporting technologies (energy storage, electric vehicles etc.) into ageing distribution networks, whilst maintaining and improving quality of supply. The project seeks to not only further develop dSTATCOM technologies for power quality support, but to additionally provide a concrete value proposition for DNSPs to adopt these emerging technologies into their networks.

Research sponsor: Queensland University of Technology

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Dr Li Li

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Li Li.

Dr Li Li

Project title: Engineering nanohybrid platforms  for oral vaccination combined with animal feed

Dr Li Li from Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) at the University of Queensland. Engineering will explore nanohybrid platforms for oral vaccination combined with animal feed. Vaccination plays an important role in large-scale commercial farming industries and has been a key reason for the success of intensive livestock cultivation.  Currently, commercial vaccines are injected but this method is costly, labour intensive, and causes stress to the animals and cross-infections.  Oral vaccination with antigen included in feed is the ideal vaccination method, especially for poultry and fish where it is difficult to vaccinate young stock.

This project aims to design and make polymer-clay nano-hybrids to load commercial vaccines combined with animal feed to protect livestock against infectious diseases.  The major goals of the platform are to safely deliver the vaccine antigens to the intestine and induce a specific long-term protection against a certain disease.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Yah Leng Lim

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Yah Leng Lim.

Dr Yah Leng Lim

Project title: Compact terahertz laser imaging system for early skin cancer detection

Dr Yah Leng Lim will develop a compact terahertz laser imaging system for early skin cancer detection. Detection of skin cancer is largely based on visible inspection of suspicious lesions. With clinical expertise, incorrect diagnosis rates remain as high as 20%. A novel, laser-based imaging system developed locally examines lesions in the non-visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum at Terahertz (THz) frequencies. It can discriminate tumour from healthy skin tissue where there is no visible change.  However, this prototype system is bulky and requires cryogenic cooling.

With Queensland being the skin cancer capital of the world, this fellowship aims to translate the prototype technology to a diagnostic tool capable of assisting clinicians in early skin cancer detection. This fellowship plans to consolidate the electronics, improve imaging performance, and remove the need for cryogenic cooling.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Pratheep Kumar Annamalai

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Pratheep Kumar Annamalia.

Dr Pratheep Kumar Annamalai

Project title: Easily deconstructed spinifex nanofibres for enhancement of high-performance construction materials

Dr Pratheep K Annamalai is Materials Engineer at Australian institute for bioengineering and nanotechnology (AIBN), the University of Queensland (UQ).  His research interests focus mainly on the formulation, processing and evaluation of polymer nanocomposites for industrial applications and biobased polymers and nanocomposites as sustainable materials.  Thinner condoms, rubber gloves with enhanced touch sensitivity, and building products with increased toughness and flexibility are some of the potential uses Queensland’s nano scientists have found for spinifex. 

This project will look at innovative development and uses of spinifex nano-cellulose to create new products and processes with potential for wide application globally in the human health and construction industries. The building and construction industry of Australia provides a major contribution to the economic and social well-being of Australians with more than $173 billion of work done annually.  With an estimated population growth up to eight million by 2044, an uncertain economy and an environment where natural disasters are common, Queensland puts forward a number of challenges and opportunities in this sector.  Key challenges in this industry are durability of the construction materials and sustainability of raw materials.

This project aims at address challenges by improving the flexural strength and reducing the shrinkage and surface cracking of cement and concrete materials, and improving in the dimensional stability and durability of bituminous road surfaces and spray-on sealants using the unique, low-cost, high-performance nanofibres that are easily deconstructed from Australian arid spinifex grasses.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Alice Hayward

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Alice Hayward.

Dr Alice Hayward

Project title: MICROpropagator - A Plant Propagation Platform Based on Novel Biomolecules

Dr Alice Hayward is a specialist in plant molecular biology with specific interest in the genetic and epigenetic regulation of plant growth and development and the interactions between plants and their environment. Rooting cuttings from elite trees is essential for clonal propagation of subtropical woody crops. Clonal propagation supports reliably higher yields and allows industry uptake of our best Queensland-bred varieties. Avocado is a high-value subtropical crop in Queensland, with huge potential for rapid industry expansion. However, root induction on cuttings of avocado and other woody species is incredibly difficult, severely restricting industry growth.

This project will develop MICROpropagator - a world-first, non-GM, non-toxic, root-inducing formula to improve clonal propagation of woody crops. MICROpropagator will be made of newly discovered molecules in plants that control root production. It will be tested in an optimised tissue-culture propagation pipeline for avocado. 

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Shihu Hu

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Shihu Hu.

Dr Shihu Hu

Project title: Energy Positive Domestic Wastewater Treatment

Dr Shihu Hu will develop an energy positive domestic wastewater treatment, transforming conventional wastewater treatment processes which focus on the removal of organics with bioenergy recovery as a secondary goal.  Consequently, only a small fraction of organic carbon contained in wastewater is converted to bioenergy. 

This project will develop next generation treatment processes to maximise bioenergy recovery from wastewater.  Wastewater treatment plants are energy-intensive and account for up to 25-40 percent of municipal energy consumption.  Rising energy costs and energy efficiency obligations are forcing the municipal management agencies to seek innovation in wastewater treatment. A pilot program to advance these new technologies will ensure a future system to capture the majority of the organic carbon and convert it into biogas in wastewater treatment plants.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr Paul Shaw

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr Paul Shaw.

Dr Paul Shaw

Project title: Development of a luminescence-based sensor for the detection of explosives

Dr Paul Shaw has developed a new technology dedicated to making people safer from explosive devices, his luminescence-based sensor for the detection of explosives is a revolutionary operation solution for security.  Being able to combine selectivity and sensitivity in a device capable of non-contact detection, for example, without resorting to swabbing, has proved very challenging therefore the broad aim of his project is to develop a compact detector that could detect the vapours released by explosives with both high sensitivity and selectivity.

The project builds on an existing collaboration between the Centre for Organic Photonics and Electronics (COPE) and Australian company Arborescent Pty Ltd to develop and commercialise a portable detector for explosives, known as Arbsense for field use.  The key technology behind Arbsense is a thin layer of a luminescent (light-emitting) molecules known as dendrimers, which are coated onto glass and can detect the vapours from explosives. The technology was a finalist last year in the Eureka Prize for Outstanding Science for Safeguarding Australia.

Research sponsor: The University of Queensland

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Dr James Kesby

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Dr James Kesby.

Dr James Kesby

Project title: Establishing therapeutic links between early dopamine function and schizophrenia

Dr James Kesbywill establishing therapeutic links between early dopamine function and schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is a poorly understood chronic psychiatric disorder. Altered brain function and psychotic symptoms present prior to disease onset suggesting a developmental origin. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that has been implicated in the cause and treatment of schizophrenia and thus represents a core developmental drug target in schizophrenia.

This project will investigate how alterations in dopamine during brain development can lead to schizophrenia-like behaviours and altered brain function in the adult. Using advanced gene silencing techniques in the rat embryo the fellowship aims to manipulate a key developmental factor within dopamine neurons.  The translational component of this research will be to identify therapeutic targets for interventions to help prevent the onset of schizophrenia in high-risk subjects.

Research sponsor: Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland

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Assoc Prof Bernadette McCabe

Research Fellow, Mid-Career—Associate Professor Bernadette McCabe.

Assoc Prof Bernadette McCabe

Project title: Process improvement of energy and value extraction from agro-industrial waste

Bernadette McCabe will investigate the use of organic waste from livestock and process through at the National Centre for Engineering in Agriculture, University of Southern Queensland. The research will focus on the utilisation of organic waste from livestock and process. Queensland is the single biggest contributor to the industry, accounting for 42% of livestock slaughtered. Substantial scope therefore exists to increase deployment of waste recovery technologies. 

This fellowship will collaborate with one of Australia's largest processing plants to develop tools and practices that better manage waste streams and biogas process optimisation. The benefits of the research will further increase profitability and reduce environmental impact across Queensland's red meat sector through developing enhanced waste management processes and technologies.

Research sponsor: University of Southern Queensland

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Licence
Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia (CC BY-ND 3.0)
Last updated
10 February, 2017

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