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Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) pilot application form guide

Th is guide will help you complete the SBIR Pilot application form. It provides a broad description of the information you should provide in your responses, and highlights potential points your application should address.

For a full understanding of the SBIR Pilot you should also read the fact sheet and frequently asked questions.

Focus of the SBIR Pilot

The goal of the SBIR Pilot to is support successful applicants to develop, test and commercialise innovative products and services that address complex government challenges. An innovative solution could be entirely new-to-market, or a novel application of existing products or services.

To support the commercialisation of developed solutions, the SBIR Pilot is structured as a procurement process—this makes it far easier for applicants to secure a government agency as a lead customer once their proposed solution has been developed.

Refer to the Queensland Government website for more information about what is required of vendors in a Queensland Government procurement process.

Assessment criteria

Applications for the SBIR Pilot will be assessed against:

  1. Do you have the capability to deliver the proposed solution?
    1. Experience and skills to deliver the solution?
    2. Access to any associated or existing intellectual property (where applicable)?
    3. Identified route to commercialise and take the solution to market?
  2. How well does the solution solve the challenge?
    1. Is the solution innovative—new to the market, already existing but applied in a new way or novel?
    2. How well does the proposed solution address the outlined constraints and deliver the benefits sought in the challenge brief?
  3. Is the project plan sound, and the proposed solution viable and achievable within the timeframes of the SBIR program stages?
  4. Does the proposed solution represent the potential for value for money, and appear financially viable with broad commercial potential?
  5. Does the proposed solution present broader benefits for Queensland?

Application form

Responses should be clear, concise and directly address the question.

Keep terminology clear and consistent throughout the application—you should minimise your use of jargon, and explain any technical terms or acronyms.

Company profile

  • Trading name

    Your trading name is the name your organisation operates under.

  • Legal name

    Your legal name is the name your organisation enters into contracts under.

  • Street address/postal address

    • Enter your organisation's street address.
    • Note: a PO Box will not be accepted as your street address.
  • Does your business have a website?

    • Provide your organisation's website.
    • If your organisation does not have a website, please link to any social media pages owned by your organisation.
  • Australian Business Number (ABN) or Australian Registered Body Number (ARBN)

    • Enter your organisation’s 11 digit Australian Business Number (ABN) without any spaces.
    • Applicants must have an ABN or ARBN to be eligible to do business with Queensland Government.
  • Is your business registered for GST?

    • Please tick 'Yes' or 'No'.
    • Your organisation must register for GST to receive funding from Queensland Government, unless it has an exemption from the Australian Tax Office.
  • How many people do you employ?

    As a guide, people are both employees and contractors, full-time and part-time, employed by the business.

  • What type of entity are you?

    Please tick the most appropriate box, based on these definitions:

    • A startup is a new business with high growth potential, developing innovative products and services for a globally scalable market.
    • An SME is a small-to-medium enterprise, and is defined as a non-startup company with less than 200 people.
    • A large private company is an unlisted company with more than 200 people.
    • A publicly listed company is a company which is traded on a stock exchange.
    • A not-for-profit is any organisation not operating to generate profit or personal gain.
    • A university is an institution registered with the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, or the research/commercialisation arm of such an institution. If you are a member of a university or research organisation applying to solve a challenge you must be able to demonstrate a clear plan on how you will commercialise your solution, and identify the commercial vehicle you will use to supply the final solution to government.
  • What is your main business activity?

    Briefly outline what your organisation does, and for whom.

Applicant details

  • Do you have any existing engagements with Queensland Government?

    Provide details of any existing contracts or engagements you have with Queensland Government.

    Refer to Clause 18.3 of the Terms and Conditions for more information on your obligations regarding conflicts of interest within the SBIR pilot.

  • Do you have any existing or potential conflicts of interest?

    Please declare if your business or personnel hold any office, possess any property, are engaged in any business or activity, or have any obligations where a conflict of interest is created, or might appear to be created.

  • How did you become aware of the SBIR program?

    Tick the appropriate box to let us know how you first became aware of the SBIR.

  • Which stage of funding are you applying for?

    • If your proposed solution does not require feasibility testing, it may be progressed directly to the Proof of Concept stage.
    • If applying directly to the Proof of Concept stage, please explain why your proposed solution does not require a feasibility study.
    • If you apply directly to the Proof of Concept stage and your proposed solution is assessed as requiring feasibility testing, you may be asked to revise your application.
    • Refer to the frequently asked questions for more information about what is expected at each stage.

Application contact person

Please provide the contact details of the primary contact person for your application.

This person will serve as the main point of contact for the Department of Science, Information Technology and Innovation and the participating agency for all enquiries regarding your proposed solution.

All correspondence and documentation concerning your application will be directed to this person.

Solution summary

  • Solution title

    • Your proposed solution’s title should be unique and succinct.
    • This will be used as a reference for your application by the Department of Science, Information Technology and Innovation, the participating agency, and the assessment panel.
  • Please provide a concise summary of your proposed solution (1,500 characters maximum).

    • This summary should explain your proposed solution.
    • It should be descriptive, but able to be understood by a broad audience—minimise and explain technical jargon and acronyms.
    • Consider in general terms why and how your solution is the appropriate approach to the challenge.

Your team

  • What relevant prior experience does your organisation have to deliver the proposed solution and take it to market (1,500 characters maximum)?

    • Provide examples of previous work relevant to the challenge you are proposing to solve.
    • Consider the capabilities necessary to develop, test and commercialise your proposed solution, and what prior projects have demonstrated or developed those capabilities.
    • Where possible, include contact details of past clients for reference purposes.
  • Who from your organisation will be working on this project (1,500 characters maximum)? Please attach the CVs of key members of the project team (maximum 1 page CV per member).

    • Consider who will be on your project team.
    • Attach the CVs of each team member, outlining relevant commercial, technical and management expertise and the proportion of time they are likely to spend on the project.
    • Provide details of where the team members will be located, and where the majority of development will occur.
  • Will you be working with any sub-contractors or partners? Who are they, and what expertise will they contribute (1,500 characters maximum)?

    • Consider any partner organisations you will be working with, or any sub-contractors you may need to engage to deliver this project.
    • Provide details of relevant commercial, technical and management expertise of each sub-contractor or partner organisation, and how much time you expect they will spend on the project.
    • Provide details of what activities sub-contractors will undertake, where possible.

About your solution

  • What is the current IP status of the proposed solution (1,500 characters maximum)?

    • Consider what protection you have in place for your own intellectual property.
    • Consider whether you have access to (and on what basis) any intellectual property relevant to the success of your proposed solution.
  • What is your route to commercialise your proposed solution (2,500 characters maximum)?

    • Consider what your process will be for taking your proposed solution to market once developed.
    • Provide details of how you will produce/deliver it to a wider market, including (where possible) approximate timeframes, estimated resource requirements, and details of your target market.
    • All applicants, including researchers, will be required to identify the commercial vehicle that will be used to supply the final solution to government and a clear plan to commercialise their idea.
  • How does your proposed solution deliver the benefits sought in the challenge statement (2,500 characters maximum)?

    • Refer to the benefits sought listed in the challenge statement for the challenge you are applying to solve.
    • Systematically address each benefit sought and specifically how your proposed solution will deliver the benefit.
    • You may find dot-points are the most suitable way to structure your response.
  • How does your proposed solution address the constraints outlined in the challenge statement (2,500 characters maximum)?

    • Refer to the identified constraints in the challenge statement for the challenge you are applying to solve.
    • Systematically discuss each identified constraint, and specifically how your proposed solution fits within the constraint.
    • You may find dot-points are the most suitable way to structure your response.
  • Describe how your proposed solution is innovative (2,500 characters maximum).

    Is your proposed solution:

    • an entirely new-to-market product or service, or
    • a new/novel application of something that exists on the market currently?

    Provide details about how it differs to existing marketing offerings.

  • Provide details of the current market around your proposed solution (2,500 characters maximum).

    • Explain the wider commercial appeal of your proposed solution outside of the SBIR Pilot.
    • Provide details of the current market around your proposed solution in regards to market size, projected growth and existing competition.

    What is your proposed solution's competitive advantage in pricing, performance and/or quality?

  • What are the key technical challenges to delivering the proposed solution, and how will these be addressed (2,500 characters maximum)?

    Outline what issues you foresee affecting the development of your proposed solution, and explain what steps your team will take to overcome them.

  • Where will the majority of the project activities be conducted (1,500 characters maximum)?

    Provide details of the locations where project work will be taking place over the course of the SBIR.

  • Please outline how the proposed solution presents broader benefits for Queensland (2,500 characters maximum)?

    Provide details of how the development of the proposed solution and the proposed solution itself offers any broader benefits for Queensland.

Team members

Please list the names and email addresses of the members of your project team.

Additional information

If you wish to link to any additional supporting information such as websites, case studies or videos, please provide a link to them here.

Supporting documents

You are required to attach a project plan (maximum 5 pages), a completed Schedule 1 to the Terms and Conditions (maximum 2 pages) and CVs of each member of the project team (maximum 1 page each). The combined size of your attachments should be no greater than 5MB.

See below for information regarding your project plan and Schedule 1.

Declaration

You must agree to all the terms of the declaration to submit your application.

Project plan

Applicants must attach a brief project plan (maximum 5 pages) for the stage of the SBIR they are applying for. This should be attached as a PDF document.

At a minimum, your project plan should cover the following key areas:

  • project scope, including what activities will be included in and excluded from the Feasibility Stage
  • description, outcomes and expected timeframes for key activities being conducted during the stage
  • planning considerations, including assumptions, constraints, external dependencies, and lessons incorporated from previous similar projects previously undertaken
  • expected risks and management strategies
  • a detailed description of outcomes and expected timeframes for key activities proposed to be conducted
  • estimated costs, including contingency budgets for identified risks and potential changes
  • a plan which outlines how the innovative idea will be commercialised and identify the commercial vehicle that will be used to supply the final solution
  • a completed Schedule 1 to the terms and conditions.

Schedule 1 to the terms and conditions

Schedule 1 to the terms and conditions (Schedule 1) of the SBIR Pilot is an indicative cost summary for the Feasibility and Proof of Concept Stages. The activities, timeframes and costs listed with Schedule 1 should align with the information provided in the project plan.

Applicants selected to progress into the SBIR Pilot will have the opportunity to revise and resubmit Schedule 1 following the Information Exchange Day, if they wish.

Guidance on completing Schedule 1 is provided below. Appendix A (PDF, 291KB) provides an example of Schedule 1.

Applicant name

This is the name of the organisation proposing the solution.

Proposal name

This is the name of your proposed solution, which you provided at the beginning of the application.

Description

This is a 1 or 2 sentence description of your proposed solution, based on the concise summary provided earlier in your application.

Stage

Many of the solutions proposed within the SBIR Pilot will require both the Feasibility and Proof of Concept Stages. If this is the case for your proposed solution, please complete Schedule 1 for the Feasibility Stage.

If you believe your proposed solution does not require feasibility testing and you are applying to progress directly to the proof of concept stage, please complete Schedule 1 for the Proof of Concept Stage.

For a clearer idea of what activities are required in each stage, refer to the frequently asked questions.

Stage start date/end date

These set out your estimated timeframes for the completion of the current stage.

The Feasibility Stage should last no longer than 6 months, and the Proof of Concept Stage no longer than 12 months. The Queensland Government reserves the right to adjust timeframes for each challenge as it deems necessary.

Description of activities

This section lists all anticipated activities within the current stage of the project. The description of each activity must be clear and concise.

Aims and outcomes

This section should outline the aims and objectives of each activity. At a minimum, you should ensure all aims stated in 'Stages of the SBIR Pilot' are covered within Schedule 1.

Start date/end date

This is the estimated timeframe for each proposed activity. It is important these are realistic timeframes, but bear in mind it is anticipated the Feasibility Stage will last no longer than 6 months, and the Proof of Concept Stage no longer than 12 months.

The Queensland Government reserves the right to adjust timeframes for each challenge as it deems necessary.

Funding sought

This is the amount of funding expected to be provided by the Queensland Government for each activity listed in Schedule 1. The bottom cell of this column should show the total funding expected from the Queensland Government.

Funding of up to $250,000 is available for the Feasibility stage and up to $500,000 for the Proof of Concept stage, at the discretion of the Queensland Government agency posing the challenge. As this is a competitive procurement process, assessment of applications will take into account value for money.

Funding sought may be negotiated by the Department of Science, Information Technology and Innovation and the participating agency following the Solution Presentation Day.

Proportion of Funding to be paid to ICT small to medium enterprises (SMEs)

If you are engaging any ICT SMEs as subcontractors for work on your SBIR proposal, please complete this table. If you are not engaging any ICT SME subcontractors, please leave this table blank.

You will need to provide some basic information on each ICT SME subcontractor you will be engaging. For each ICT SME subcontractor, provide:

  • the name of the ICT SME subcontractor
  • the anticipated role of the ICT SME subcontractor in the project
  • where the ICT SME subcontractor's global headquarters are located
  • total number of people employed by the ICT SME at the time applications close
  • the net value to be paid to the ICT SME subcontractor and the percentage total funding sought this represents.

Further information

Licence
Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia (CC BY-ND 3.0)
Last updated
21 February, 2017

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